Crop Production & Physiology


Faculty in Crop Production & Physiology

Dr. K. Delate
Organic Crops Specialist
147 Horticulture Building,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-7069
kdelate@iastate.edu

Dr. S. Goggi
Seed Physiology
195C Seed Science Center,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-6372
susana@iastate.edu

Dr. R.G. Hartzler
Weed Science
2104K Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-1923
hartzler@iastate.edu

Dr. E. Heaton
Production and management of dedicated energy crops
1403 Agronomy Hall
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-1310
heaton@iastate.edu

Dr. J.L. Hatfield
Agricultural Meterology
108A NLAE,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-5723
hatfield@nstl.gov

Dr. D.L. Karlen
Soil and Crop Management
314 NLAE,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-3336
karlen@nstl.gov

Dr. T.C. Kaspar
Crop Production and Physiology
238 NLAE,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-8873
kaspar@nstl.gov

Dr. A.D. Knapp
Crop Production and Physiology, Seed Physiology and Technology
1301 Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-9830
adknapp@iastate.edu

Dr. A. Lenssen
Crop Production and Physiology
1405 Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-1060
alenssen@iastate.edu

Dr. M.Z. Liebman
Agricultural Ecology
3405 Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-7486
mliebman@iastate.edu

Dr. F. Miguez
Crop and soil statistical and mathematical modeling.
1206 Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011
515-294-5980
femiguez@iastate.edu

Dr. K.J. Moore
Forage Management and Utilization
1567 Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011
515-294-5482
kjmoore@iastate.edu

Dr. R.E. Mullen
Crop Physiology and Production
1126B Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-3271
remullen@iastate.edu

Dr. M.D.K. Owen
Weed Science
3218 Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-1923
mdowen@iastate.edu

Dr. M.E. Westgate
Crop development and reproductive physiology
1563 Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-9654
westgate@iastate.edu

Dr. M.H. Wiedenhoeft
Crop Production and Physiology
1126D Agronomy Hall,
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,
515-294-3274
mwiedenh@iastate.edu

Download PDF file >>

Crop Production and Physiology (CP&P) includes crop physiology, ecology, and management; forage quality and utilization; seed productionI and physiology; weed biology and control. Emphasis is on corn, soybeans, oats, and forages. Students also have the option of specializing in seed or weed science.

The program goals are to provide every graduate with the theoretical concepts and practical experience needed to function effectively as an independent scientist in the public or private sector. The learning experience in the Crop Production and Physiology Program has three major components: academic courses, thesis or dissertation research, and informal interaction among faculty and students. We believe that a collegial environment is essential for personal intellectual growth.

Graduate students can select from a wide range of advanced courses in agronomy, biochemistry, genetics, horticulture, meteorology, molecular biology, plant physiology, seed and weed science, and sustainable agriculture. Depending upon research interest and career focus, the student, in consultation with his/her advisory committee, will design a program of study (POS) from courses taught in several departments. The CP&P Program has no foreign language requirement.

Generally, students will be expected to develop a basic competence in crop physiology, plant physiology, statistics, and biochemistry. There is no foreign language requirement. Students whose research is of a basic nature may obtain the M.S. or Ph.D. with a major in Plant Physiology through an interdepartmental program in which Agronomy participates.


Guidelines for Graduate Course Requirements

CROP PRODUCTION AND PHYSIOLOGY MAJOR

Entering students are expected to have a basic competence in physical science, mathematics, and plant science. Minor deficiencies in these areas usually can be addressed during graduate study. Minimum competency is defined by undergraduate credit in the following subject areas (ISU course equivalent in parentheses).


All candidates:
Course area (Iowa State University catalogue designation) Crop Physiology (Agron 230), Soil Fertility (Agron 354), Genetics (Agron 320), Plant Physiology (Biol 330), Organic Chemistry I (Chem 331), Analytical Geometry (Math 142).


Ph.D. candidates:
Above plus Plant Anatomy (Biol 454), Organic Chemistry II (Chem 332), Calculus (Math 181), Physics (Phys 111 & 112). Candidates should recognize that these are minimum expectations. Additional requirements for specific areas of study may be required.


Program of Studies Guidelines:
All M.S. and PhD candidates are to establish their program of studies via discussion with their major professor and their program of studies committee. It is recommended that students take at least one course from each of the following core areas.


Core Area 1: Molecular Biology / Biochemistry

Catalog Number

Course Title

Credits

Agron 616

Advanced Topics in Crop Physiology & Biochemistry

4

BBMB 404

Biochemistry I

3

BBMB 405

Biochemistry II

3

BBMB 501

Comprehensive Biochemistry I

4

BBMB 502

Comprehensive Biochemistry II

4

BBMB 542

Introduction to Molecular Biology Techniques

1-5

BBMB 607

Plant Lipid Biochemistry

2

P Phy 545

Plant Molecular Biology

3

Core Area 2: Growth and Development

Biol 454

Plant Anatomy

3

Biol 428

Cell Biology

2

GDCB 528

Cellular Growth and Regulation

3

GDCB 529

Plant Cell Biology

3

Hort 551

Growth and Development of Perennial Grasses

2

P Phy 512

Plant Growth & Development

3

Core Area 3: Plant Physiology and Metabolism

Agron 516

Crop Physiology

3

Agron 508

Biophysical Crop Ecology

3

Agron 519

Herbicide Physiology and Biochemistry

2

Agron 538

Seed Physiology

2

Agron 553

Soil-Plant Relationships

3

Agron 616

Advanced Topics in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry

4

BBMB 645

Molecular Signaling

2

Hort 537

Plant Stress Biology

3

P Phy 513

Metabolism

2

Core Area 4: Crop Ecology and Management

Agron 509

Agroecosystem Analysis

3

Agron 515

Integrated Crop and Livestock Production Systems

3

Agron 517

Weed Biology and Ecology

3

Agron 530

Ecologically Based Pest Management Strategies

3

Agron 553

Soil-Plant Relationships

3

Biol 474

Plant Ecology

3

EEOB 570

Landscape Ecology

3

EEOB 582

Functional Ecology

3

EEOB 584

Ecosystem Ecology

3

Biol 472

Community Biology

3

EEOB 588

Population Ecology

3

Hort 524

Sustainable and Enviornmental Horticulture Systems

2

PL P 577

Bacterial Plant Interactions

3

PL P 594

Seed Pathology

3

Core Area 5: Statistics/Quantitative Methods

AGron 526

Field Plot Technique

3

Stat 401

Statistical Methods for Research Workers

4

Stat 402

Statistical Design & the Analysis of Experiments

3

Stat 407

Methods of Multivariate Analysis

3

Stat 505

Environmental Statistics

3

Stat 512

Design of Experiments

3

BCB 596

Computational Molecular Biology

3

CRP 551

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

3

NREM 546

Integrating GPS AMD GIS for Natural Resource Management

3

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

All students are expected to register and attend Crop Physiology and Production Seminar (600C) each term; they are expected to make one presentation for the M.S. and three for the Ph.D. (two beyond the M.S.).

For Research, Agron 699B, students are expected to register for a minimum of 7 Cr for the MS (thesis) and 24 Cr for the Ph.D.

If a student has had a similar course at another institution our requirement may be waived or satisfied by an audit. These are minimum requirements.

Prospective Ph.D. candidates are advised to complete these courses in addition to those required for the MS so that he/she may focus on research for the Ph.D.

DESIGNATED "MINOR ONLY" COURSES CROP PRODUCTION AND PHYSIOLOGY

CP&P graduate students may take 400-level Agronomy courses outside the major, and not required for the BS in Agronomy, for credit toward their MS or PhD degree. The candidate is limited by the department to no more than three such courses. The POS Committee may choose, however, not to accept any such credits to fulfill the degree requirements.

Additionally, courses specifically designated for the Master of Science in Agronomy and Master of Professional Agriculture degrees may be accepted for graduate credit toward the MS or PhD, but they are restricted to the "minor only" category. These courses may not be used to substitute for any POS-required course.

GRADUATE STUDENT POLICIES – ANNUAL REVIEW

The department will evaluate graduate student progress annually. Graduate students will be asked to submit an Annual Report Form by 1 February. Reports are to be signed by the major professor and submitted to the Graduate Student Coordinator (1126 Agron Hall) by the date indicated.

TEACHING ASSISTANTS (TAs)

The teaching activities for TAs average 15 hours per week for both fall and spring terms and 5 hours per week in the summer semester (actual hours per term may vary). The nature of the teaching responsibilities shall be arranged in consultation with the graduate student and major professor. Teaching assistants will be involved primarily in the undergraduate teaching program and receive two credits in Agron 698 for each term of involvement.

AGRONOMY 698 TEACHING PRACTICUM

The Department of Agronomy at Iowa State recognizes the importance of teaching and extension experiences in the professional development of MS and PhD candidates. Students have the opportunity to receive credit for teaching/extension experiences, Agron 698, Teaching Practicum. Students earn one credit in Agron 698 for each 5 hours of effort. The course is offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only and the grade will be awarded by the staff member supervising the teaching/extension experience. Graduate students are encouraged to visit with teaching or extension faculty in the department in order to select the most appropriate experience.

UNIFORM WRITTEN PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION CROP PRODUCTION AND PHYSIOLOGY POLICY

POLICY

All PhD students majoring in Crop Production and Physiology at Iowa State are required to take a written preliminary examination. If a student fails the examination, the respective POS Committee may require the student to retake the examination, to answer additional written questions, or proceed with the oral examination. Passage of the written examination is required for a student to move to an oral examination by her/his POS Committee. The final decision regarding the student's suitability as a doctoral candidate resides with the student's POS Committee.

PROCEDURE

The written examination is administered by the student’s POS Committee, the second week of October and the second week of February each academic year. A student wishing to take the written examination is required to develop a written agreement with her/his POS Committee to establish the date of examination.

The examination consists of two daily sessions, each starting at 8 a.m. and ending at 1 p.m. Students are required to answer up to four questions each day. This is a closed book examination.

The PhD student’s POS Committee is responsible for writing and grading the examination. Questions may be drawn from the bank of prior exam questions available to all CP&P students and faculty. New questions also may be included in an examination, at the discretion of the POS Committee. Subject areas from which questions are developed include but not limited to: plant physiology and metabolism, plant anatomy, plant growth and development, crop ecology and management, weed science, and statistics.

Prior to administering a written examination, each POS Committee sends the assembled set of examination questions to the three-member CP&P written examination committee for review. The review is intended to promote consistency with regard to rigor, breadth, and depth of the exam questions. Suggestions for changes in content are returned to the POS Committee in a timely manner. Differences of opinion concerning examination content are resolved in consultation with the chair of the Plant and Climate panel.

POS Committee members grade the student’s answers to the examination questions on a scale of 1-5 scale (1=unsatisfactory, 2=poor, 3=pass, 4=good, 5=excellent). An average score of at least 3.0 with no more than two answers being scored less than 3.0 is required to pass the written preliminary examination.